Last edited by Mugar
Tuesday, December 1, 2020 | History

2 edition of How does Jesus take away our sins? found in the catalog.

How does Jesus take away our sins?

J. Collins Odgers

How does Jesus take away our sins?

a sermon preached on behalf of the Ulster Unitarian Christian Association, at the First Presbyterian Church, Rosemary Street, Belfast, April 29th, 1901

by J. Collins Odgers

  • 263 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by Ulster Unitarian Christian Association in Belfast .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby Rev. J. Collins Odgers.
ContributionsUlster Unitarian Christian Association.
The Physical Object
Pagination14p. ;
Number of Pages14
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15967281M


Share this book
You might also like
The Victoria History of the County of Sussex

The Victoria History of the County of Sussex

Contemporary subway station design

Contemporary subway station design

manifold grace of God

manifold grace of God

Elements of the theory of functions and functional analysis

Elements of the theory of functions and functional analysis

Journey into art

Journey into art

A.F.T.U./Bill Hodges Gallery presents selections from The Revival series by Benny Andrews : exhibition dates April 13-June 17, 1995.

A.F.T.U./Bill Hodges Gallery presents selections from The Revival series by Benny Andrews : exhibition dates April 13-June 17, 1995.

Post-authoritarian cultures

Post-authoritarian cultures

Kiabara readings on religion & culture in Africa

Kiabara readings on religion & culture in Africa

Ritchie Blackmore

Ritchie Blackmore

Toward functional nanomaterials

Toward functional nanomaterials

Alaska geographic differential study, 1985

Alaska geographic differential study, 1985

A resolution of doubts, or, A summary decision of the controversies between the Church of Rome and the reformed church

A resolution of doubts, or, A summary decision of the controversies between the Church of Rome and the reformed church

The professor who changed my life

The professor who changed my life

Cost benefit analysis of HIV workplace programmes in Zambia

Cost benefit analysis of HIV workplace programmes in Zambia

Great detective stories of the world

Great detective stories of the world

Preparation of ferro-uranium

Preparation of ferro-uranium

How does Jesus take away our sins? by J. Collins Odgers Download PDF EPUB FB2

Because of certain biblical and doctrinal ways of expressing this, the impression can be given that Jesus’ suffering and death took away the sins of the world by somehow paying off a debt to God, namely, that God took Jesus’ suffering as compensation for our sin – implying that God had lived in anger since Adam’s sin, waiting for someone to adequately pay the debt before that sin could be.

Even the Old Testament sacrifices that were ordered by the Lord could never take away sin. They were never intended to take away sin. It is only through the sacrifice of the Lord Jesus Christ on the cross of Calvary that we can have our sins taken away. So, why did Jesus die for our sins.

Jesus Christ was manifested to take away sins. This is the great purpose of His coming into the world. Linked with that purpose is the great possibility that flows. When Jesus, the Son of God, was on the cross, God placed on Him the sins of the whole world.

Then God poured out His holy wrath upon Jesus. Jesus took the punishment that we deserve on the cross, so that we can be saved, forgiven, and made right with God.

Jesus paid a debt He did not owe, because we owed a debt we could not pay. Question: "What does it mean that Jesus died for our sins?" Answer: Simply put, without Jesus’ death on the cross for our sins, no one would have eternal life.

Jesus Himself said, “I am the way and the truth and the one comes to the Father except through me” (John ). One of the Bible’s greatest truths is that when we turn to Jesus Christ in repentance and faith, God forgives our sins and gives us the gift of eternal life.

We no longer need to fear death or Hell or judgment, because Christ endured them for us. As the Bible says, “He forgave us all our sins” (Colossians ). But if anyone does sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous. He is the propitiation for our sins, and not for ours only but also for the sins of the whole world.

Isaiah ESV / helpful votes. Answer: When the Bible speaks of our sins being washed away, it means we are forgiven. Our sins, which had defiled us, are gone. By the grace of God through Christ, we are no longer spiritually corrupt; we stand justified before God. The concept of having our sins washed away is first introduced in the Old Testament.

And you know that He was manifested to take away our sins, and in Him there is no sin.” (1 Jn ) Jesus Christ was manifested to take away sins. This is the great purpose of His coming into the world. Linked with that purpose is the great possibility that flows from it: “in Him there is no sin”.

This is the glorious gospel of hope. Jesus answers, “Take My life instead.” The fact that Jesus took our place shows God’s great love: “Greater love has no one than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends” (John ). But the penalty for sin extends beyond physical death to include a spiritual separation from God.

Again, in this matter, Jesus took our place. In summary, the sins of every human fell “on” Jesus in the sense that He suffered as if He were guilty of every sin of every sinner in the world. He also suffered “in” His body as He experienced the penalty due everyone because of the sins that they have and will commit.

The holy scriptures tell us that Jesus did not sin. Answer: The Bible gives the good news that Jesus paid the price for our sin (Ephesians ), yet in many ways we still suffer the consequences of our sins. For example, a drug dealer may become a Christian in prison, but that doesn’t mean he will be released from prison the next day—he will still experience the consequences of his past sin.

Simpel: In order to exchange our sins Moses recieved the laws of sacrificeing an animal to atone for your sins. That happened once a year with yom kippur. But for animals you need to do this over and over again every year (if you sinned) since an.

Then, 1 John says, “And ye know that he was manifested to take away our sins; and in him is no sin.” We have a scriptural principle found in Deuteronomy which says, “ at the mouth of two witnesses, or at the mouth of three witnesses, shall the matter be established.”.

Hebrews 9 v So Christ was sacrificed once to take away the sins of many people; and he will appear a second time, not to bear sin, but to bring salvation to those who are waiting for him.

1 John 2 v 2: He is the atoning sacrifice for our sins, and not only for ours but also for the sins of the whole world. Hebrewshowever, notes that this changed with the sacrifice of Jesus: "And every priest stands daily at his service, offering repeatedly the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins.

But when Christ had offered for all time a single sacrifice for sins, he sat down at the right hand of God.". Q2. Did Jesus only provide a new way to get sin forgiven or did Jesus really take away the sins of the world.

When a person sinned, he brought the specified sacrifice to the Jewish priest, confessed his sin to God, the animal's blood was shed and atonement was made.

The person s sin was forgiven by God and the sinner was cleansed. From a history of religions standpoint, the practice of a sacrifice to appease a god precedes the ancient Israelite religion. The Israelites had an intense sacrificial cult, which included the Passover lamb (whose imagery was adopted by Christia.

The next day John saw Jesus coming toward him and said, "Look. There is the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world. John God did. A number of prominent sectarian theologians contend that as the Lord languished upon the cross, he *literally bore our sins in his body", so that, in a sense, Jesus actually died in sin.

Martin Luther, the prominent Protestant reformer, in his commentary on Galatians (as reflected in the edition), taught that the prophets of the Old. Consider this one phrase: Jesus died for our sins. Hebrew Christians of the first century C.E. could grasp it with relative ease.

They knew about the ancient system of animal sacrifice designed, among other things, to atone for the sins of the nation of Israel. Hebrews Jesus the Only True Sacrifice for Sin. God takes our sin seriously. The blood of animals could not obtain redemption. However, by His death, Jesus Christ removed "the sins of many people." A permanent sacrifice for sin is needed to deal permanently with our sin problem.

In fact, the whole sacrificial system established by God in the Old Testament set the stage for the coming of Jesus Christ, who is the perfect sacrifice God would provide as atonement for the sins of His people (Romans ; Hebrews 10).

The sacrifice of lambs played a very important role in the Jewish religious life and sacrificial system. These traits are how we can know that our sins were fully paid for and that our forgiveness is fully secured by the death of Jesus.

And one of those traits is how we deal with ongoing sinning in our lives. This is the complicating issue: Christians sin. That’s what John is dealing with in 1 John “If we say we have no sin, we deceive.

Because Jesus took all our sins, He has removed them from our record, and they no longer exist. Our present state before God is that of a perfect being. Though we live in our same fallible bodies, and we will at times, continue to sin, all these transgressions have been removed by the precious blood of Jesus when He died for us.

And once again it is confirmed that Jesus came to take away sins – something that the blood of bulls and goats could never do. It is not a matter of substitutive sacrifice. It is a matter of true identification with Jesus sacrifice. When Jesus died, your sinful. That's what Peter is spelling out here in language taken from those Scriptures: Christ bore our sins in his body on the cross; that is, he died for our sins according to Isaiah This is tremendously good news for sinners.

It is the only hope for a church that has come through what we have come through. Christ bore our sins. From that point humans had sin and that sin seperated us from God.

In olden days, when people wanted forgivness of sin from God they would just sacrifice a lamb or ox. God now went on to make himself incarnate (Jesus) so he could sacrifice himself and take away sin. Taking Humanity to Take Away Sin. In other words, Jesus was able to be the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world because he was the God-man.

The Word became flesh (). And now we see the central reason why: to take away the sin of the world. One theory, sometimes referred to as "substitution," "satisfaction" or "ransom" theology, was championed by St.

Anselm in the 11th century. He believed that Christ's sacrificial death was necessary in order to liberate humanity from sin and restore communion with the Father, that the blood of Jesus was "payment" to God for human sin. However, we know from the New Testament in Hebrews that the blood of bulls and goats cannot take away our sins.

Only the blood of Christ does that. So, if anyone is to be forgiven, it has to be through Christ's sacrifice on the cross. Therefore, all of the Old Testament saints who are saved, will have to be saved by the same sacrifice of.

The eternal punishment for sin is no longer upon those who accept Christ as Lord and Savior. God no longer punishes us for our sin because Jesus took that punishment.

But sometimes, the Bible says, bad things that happen to us are a result of God’s discipline. They are not a retribution or punishment for sin; rather, they are a correction, as a parent would correct a child. But he didn’t. Nowhere in the Bible does Jesus say he’ll die for our sins.

Jesus said he would die and return. He didn’t say he was taking the sins of the world with him. That idea is in the Bible, but it came about nearly 50 or 60 years later, which are not recorded in this book.

The Bible contrasts the effectiveness of sacrifices made by Jewish priests and the sacrifice made by our great high priest, Jesus: “Day after day every priest stands and performs his religious duties; again and again he offers the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins.

Christians acknowledge that Jesus is the fulfillment of this prophecy, that he suffered and died for our sins, that he paid the price for all of our sins.

Sin and atonement are themes that run throughout the Bible, from the first book in the Bible (Genesis), to the last book in the Bible (Revelation). Sin separates people from God. DOES ACTS TEACH THAT WATER BAPTISM WASHES AWAY SINS.

by Shawn Brasseaux “And now why tarriest thou. arise, and be baptized, and wash away thy sins, calling on the name of the Lord” (Acts ). Ananias told Saul of Tarsus these words shortly after the latter’s conversion.

Is it really true that water baptism. Somebody somewhere taught very good catechism classes, because everybody knows that Jesus died to save us from our sins. It’s in every liturgy and all of our Mass prayers. This idea that salvation takes place through the cross to save us and forgive us from sins has a real grip on our collective imagination.

Take with you words, and turn to the LORD: say unto him, Take away all iniquity, and receive us graciously: so will we render the calves of our lips.

John The next day John seeth Jesus coming unto him, and saith, Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world. Jesus Offering of Himself. This Day of Atonement was a Burnt Offering and was considered the most important of the Jewish High Days because of the significance of assigning the guilt on the scape goat and placing hands on the goats head and then sending him off into the Wilderness, thus sending away the sins of the people.

The Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world!'" I JOHN "And you know that he [the Messiah] was manifested to take away our sins, and in him there is no sin.

Yeshua the Messiah is the goat that carried away the sins of Israel. He took them upon himself and "was made to be sin for us" (2 Corinthians ).